Anthologia: Gender Special

I’ve had a couple of poems, ‘a toast’ and ‘I am pregnant with proclamations of love’ from Anatomy added to an Anthologia on gender collected by Plymouth’s poet laureate, Blaidh Nemorlith (Thom Boulton).

You can read the Anthologia here.

As well as my stuff, there is work from other lovely Plymouth poets and an essay on gender too. It’s a really diverse and interesting selection.

New review for Anatomy

Thanks very much to Lunar Poetry for publishing a review by Kyle Cooper of Anatomy . It’s a very kind review as well.

If you’d like to read it all, you can purchase a copy of the journal here.

However, here’s a happy quote:

“Mostly, however, Travers evokes the contemporary world with an elegance that is rare. Against this constant stream of
status updates, bright screens and blaring noise, the relationship is barely a whisper; and because of this, it is successful.”

The team responsible for Lunar Poetry are also trying at the moment to crowdsource £5000 with the aim of setting up a specialist poetry bookshop in London. Perhaps you could consider giving their campaign a visit here.

You might appreciate Anatomy if… 4

Apologies again for the time delay between posts in this series.

I wrote a book last year and called it ‘Anatomy’. It’s a collection of poems and essays that ask about what the Song of Solomon has to say to the 21st century.

In this collection of posts, I want to highlight 5 sets of people who might appreciate my book.

You might appreciate Anatomy if you are

4: prepared to embrace the poetry glut.

‘Anatomy’ is one more book which belongs to the global, all-time poetry and culture glut. There are many ways of negotiating with the poetry glut. Below I explain the way I am aiming for in poetry form. If you like what I am saying in this poem, you may well identify with the way I have developed ‘Anatomy’ and brought it to market. In which case, I invite you to buy a paperback copy through paypal from this site,  or an ebook version from Amazon.

EMBRACE THE GLUT. CONFESS THE GLUT.

Embrace the abundance of your neighbour’s sunset.
Confess there are wiser parents than you.
Embrace the circle and the shut-tight curtain.
Confess with applause those who showed up too.
Embrace street skaters and harvest festivals.
Confess that on beaches our footprints look the same.
Embrace the moving iceberg and trampled blossom.
Confess the fear of starting again.
Embrace that the opposite of serious is shallow.
Confess truth from the bargain basement is truth.
Embrace that your calling is what you are named and
Confess those who call you a poet as proof.

Blog feature for Anatomy

I’m delighted to draw your attention to another blog that has featured ‘Anatomy’.

Miranda Innaimo, an independent author and blogger, very kindly put together a feature and review of the book. Naturally, I was pleased about this not only for the publicity, but also because I follow Miranda’s blog and it makes me smile every time I read it.

Here is the article that Miranda wrote on Anatomy.

Miranda writes about ‘Anatomy’ “When reading Travers’ rich text, I experienced a wide range of emotional convictions that writing as good at that remarkably exposes: I found myself blushing with the intimacy revealed between husband and wife, delightfully sighing with their sighs…”


You can follow Miranda’s blog from this link.

You can purchase Miranda’s collections of poetry by following this link.

You can follow Miranda on Twitter from this link.

You might appreciate Anatomy if… 3

Apologies for the gap between posts in this series.

I wrote a book last year and called it ‘Anatomy’. It’s a collection of poems and essays that ask about what the Song of Solomon has to say to the 21st century.

In this collection of posts, I want to highlight 5 sets of people who might appreciate my book.

You might appreciate Anatomy if you are

3. Someone who wants to imagine being a Christian.

I am a Christian and a reader of theology. I have read many books that explain what Christians are supposed to think and believe. However, I am also aware that many people have a sense that they would be interested in exploring faith, except that they could never imagine being a Christian. They look not to see beliefs, but lives, and find it hard to believe that faith could fit them.

One of the metaphors that the Bible repeatedly uses for a relationship with Jesus is that of marriage. At the end of the Bible, when heaven comes, the church is pictured like a bride walking to be married to her groom, Jesus. This is not the only metaphor which the Bible uses to describe a relationship with Jesus, but it is a powerful one.

By taking the Bible’s poem about marriage, Song of Solomon, and reflecting its themes and imagery into 21st century, I want to explore marriage as a metaphor for faith. When I started writing the poems, I found myself emotionally where faith was more about being kissed than kissing, more about finding a shared mutating identity that goes beyond myself. It’s exciting and beautiful, but it comes with risk and cost.

In the conversations I have had with Christians since publishing the book, not all have seen the Christian life as they understand it represented. I wanted to get beneath a veneer of social respectability, which is why the poems are just the husband speaking to the wife and vice versa. My personal opinion is that faith is not there to make us respectable, it is there to unite us with Christ in initimate, vulnerable, radical ways. I hope my faith and my poetry find an intimate, vulnerable, radical language.

If you want to find out more about Anatomy, read the introduction here.

If you have a question or comment about Anatomy, you can send feedback using the contact form or contact me by Facebook or Twitter.